The Sea

As I type now, I am amazed at the cleanliness of the computer and screen. Before I left for camp, I had cleaned the IPad and my laptop for the first time in a while. New beginnings.

Before I left, I drew a map to the campsite as described to me by the camp director. (And you saw in the last post.) I then had Lado translate the key words into Georgian script. I finished packing and went downstairs for my last meal.

The parting was awkward. The only people there were the grandparents and Nika. My new host family had offered to take me to Shekvetili. Lado offered 30 minutes before they were to pick me up. It was a nice gesture, but late. I think the family didn’t make more of a big deal of my leaving, because would still be living in town. I wish I had seen Nino before I left though.

My new host family came promptly at 1 o’clock. We packed my things in the back of the truck. The mom came along too, so I sat in the back with Giorgi. I showed them the map, and they said they understood. We stopped at their home to pick up a couple of things before we left town.

When we arrived at the house, I noticed that that had left all of the doors and windows open. What I further noticed was this house didn’t have bars on the windows. The last host home not only had bars on the windows, but they also locked all of the doors to the exterior of the house and both doors upstairs on the ends of the main corridor. It was like Fort Knox. As we left, they still didn’t shut the doors and windows. When I tried to remind the mom, she laughed me off and implied that the neighbor would watch over the house.

They changed their clothes for the beach, and I grabbed some last minute items for the summer. And off we went.

We rode for about 25 minutes. On the main road where we were supposed to look for the turnout, we passed one marker and promptly left the town where the camp was. We stopped to ask for directions at a gas station, but as the email said, the building was so new, that no one knew where it was. I called the property owner on the phone and she gave more accurate directions. Good thing too, because the email directions were wrong. When we turned off the main road, there were tons of beach homes/ cottages. It reminded me of North Myrtle Beach. But that meant we were in a maze of houses and immediately got lost. I called one more time, and we finally were directed to the correct spot.

Facility is a three story cottage with bunks in all the rooms. It’s in close quarters to all the other cottages. The beach is maybe 2 football fields away through a grove of pine trees. As said before, its brand spanking new. Only the house keepers were there to let me into my room. After my host family explained a couple of things to me, we parted ways.

On the second story balcony, a lady yelled out ‘Hello! How are you?’ in broken English. She asked if I needed help and summoned a little girl over. She introduced herself to me and I now introduce you to Devina.

Devina

Devina

Devina is a girl of 9. She has a British father and Georgian mother. I get the impression that she splits her time between England and Tbilisi. For some reason, it took a while for her to get her English going again. But once she did, she was super inquisitive. This is her first time in summer camp. She is here with her grandmother and her mother and brother will come within the week. She reminds me of Thumper from the Bambi movie. I am assuming (hoping) that the other students will be of the same caliber of English proficiency.

***

I know that you’re smiling, baby,
I don’t even need to see your face
Sunset at the shoreline, we are laughing, breaking up,
Just like the waves
Are you feeling, feeling, feeling like I’m, feeling
Like I’m floating, floating, up above that big blue ocean
Sand beneath our feet, big blue sky above our heads,
No need to keep stressing from our everyday life on our minds
We have got to leave all that behind

At The Beach, The Avett Brothers

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